Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz

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Arrows of Advertising – An Australian Shell Poster Campaign designed by Frank Eidlitz

Gebrauchsgraphik always provide fantastic content for anyone interested in graphic design history. A key feature in issue 9, 1964 features the work of Frank Eidlitz.

Shell commissioned Frank Eidlitz for their 1960s Australian publicity campaign. Frank was born in Budapest, Hungary and moved to Australia around 1955, he the designer and art director of USP Benson, an Australian design agency based in Melbourne.  A total of 24 posters were created for the campaign during 1964, using the arrow symbol as a key features, representing power, motion and speed. The handmade lithographs use up to 19 colours, which were individually printed at large scale. The posters also utilise the brand colours red and yellow from Shells corporate identity.

Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz
Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz

 

To say Frank Eidlitz was energetic is to damn him with faint praise. To say he was hyperactive is a serious understatement. To say he was manic is getting a little closer to the truth, but this excessive energy was never wasted, he managed to channel it all into his work, and during the sixties and seventies he produced some of the most dynamic graphic design seen in Australia before or since.

https://recollection.com.au/biographies/frank-eidlitz

 

Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz
Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz

 

Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz
Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz

 

Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz
Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz

 

Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz
Posters for the Shell Service Stations by Frank Eidlitz

 

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