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Content includes:
Maintaining the Derelict
Advertising to Canadians by Charles W. Stokes
A Book of Design Case Histories: A Review of the Second Annual Publication of U.S. Industrial Design
Reco Capey and the Birth of Flair
A Case History of the Container Design, Packaging, Presentation and Publicity of Yardley’s New Perfume
Typography- The Ambassador: Report on the Third International Silk Congress
The Raymond King Organisation
New Designs from the Factories

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Art and Industry 307, January 1952
Art and Industry 307, January 1952
More graphic design artefacts
From the design archive:
From the design archive:
From the design archive:
From the design archive:
More graphic design history articles

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Perusing an issue of Der Druckspiegel from 1962, I found these fantastic examples of Swiss Design, produced for the University Ball at the University in St. Gallen, Switzerland, in 1961. The advertising matter included posters, newspaper advertisements, cinema slides, invitation cards and a booklet. 

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Before ascending to fame within the contemporary art scene, Warhol enjoyed a thriving career as a commercial artist. His illustration work was commissioned by various magazines, including The New Yorker, Vogue, and Harper's Bazaar.

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Many influential British designers have made their names in the history books. Abram Games, Alan Fletcher, Tom Eckersley and Derek Birdsall, to name a few. But one designer that has always influenced me, not only as inspiration from their design output, but as an example of the role of a designer and the importance of having strong ethics, is Ken Garland. He is known for his innovative and socially responsible approach to graphic design and his involvement in the design community through his teaching, writing and activism. In the second instalment of this series, I will discuss Ken Garland's magazine work from my collection.

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A total of 24 posters were created for the campaign during 1964, using the arrow symbol as a key features, representing power, motion and speed. The handmade lithographs use up to 19 colours, which were individually printed at large scale. The posters also utilise the brand colours red and yellow from Shells corporate identity.