Information

Catalogue for the exhibit ‘Kinetics’ at the Hayward Gallery, September 25 – November 22, 1970. All seventy seven artists featured in the exhibition have their own double sided folded sheet, with portrait information and an image/s of their contribution.

Artists featured in the exhibition and catalogue include; Stephen Antonakos, Fletcher Benton, Alberto Biasi, Davide Boriani, Martha Boto, Robert Breer, Pol Bury, Alexander Calder, Nino Calos, Malcolm Carder, Al Cheney, Gianni Colombo, Mike Cooper, H R Demarco, Horacio Garcia-Rossi, Gerhard Von Graevenitz, Keith Grant, Lily Greenham, Michael Hayden, Ser Hoogenboom, Arie Jansma, Robert Janz, Howard Jones, John Kaine, Gyula Kosice, Piotr Kowalski, Harry Kramer, Dante Leonelli, Julio Le Parc, Liliane Lijn, Peter Logan, Ernst Lurker, Adolf Luther, Heinz Mack, Frank J Malina, Ronald Mallory, Willem Marijs, Barry Martin, Kenneth Martin, Manfredo Massironi, Charles Mattox, Preston Mcclanahan, Michael Mckinnon, Christian Megert, Francois Morellet, Hans Walter Muller, Bruno Munari, Nam June Paik, Otto Piene, Chuck Prentiss, William Pye, George Rickey, Gary T Rieveschl, Marcello Salvadori, Nicholas Schoffer, James Seawright, Ray Staakman, Takis, Jean Tinguely, Gunther Uecker, Gregorio Vardanega, Gabriele De Vecchi, Frans Verpoorten, Roger Vilder, Stephen Willats, Bryan Wynter and Johan Van Zutphen

Details

Linked Information

Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes
Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes

 

Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes
Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes

 

Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes
Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes

 

Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes
Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes

 

Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes
Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes

 

Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes
Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes

 

Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes
Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes

 

Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes
Kinetics, Hayward Gallery, London, 1970. Designed by Crosby/Fletcher/Forbes
More graphic design artefacts
From the design archive:
From the design archive:
From the design archive:
More graphic design history articles
The first American university to accept graphic designers as members of the faculty was the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, called M. I. T, for short. The work created by the design group reflects the high level of instruction, the realistic setting of the training and the progressive philosophy of this institute.
The book "Modern Man In The Making" (1939), is a fantastic example of Neurath's work. The book uses Isotype's principles with text to illustrate complex societal issues like globalisation and war's impact on economies, prioritising visual recognition through symbols to aid in memorability—a philosophy that remains paramount in design today.
Last month (March 2022), I spoke to over fifty Graphic Design undergraduates about the archive and my passion for design history, after which the students had full access to items in the collection and participated in discourse amongst their peers and lecturers. As part of their critical studies unit, the students will be producing essays and content related to the impact, history and aesthetics of selected artefacts.

Members Content

Victorian Graphic Design left a mark on both British and American design history. In Britain, the ornate embellishments served as a symbol of prosperity and cultural values. Meanwhile, America embraced the combination of various design elements to navigate the complexities of a rapidly changing society driven by industrialisation and consumerism.