Printing Review, No 22, Winter 1936-7

Information

Content includes:
Submitting a Process to the Prospect By J. H. Butlin, M.A.
A Note on Design and Illustration By Percy Smith
Problems in Gold Bronzing By W. C. Glass, A.S.M.E.
Novelty in Advertising Contributed
SUPPLEMENT- -RUBBER PLATE PROCESS KENT VALE
Print and Progress—1936 – By C. F. Evans
INSET-EXHIBITS AT OLYMPIA
Winkler-Lambert Super Rotary By Georges Degaast
Some more Book Types of To-day By A. F. Johnson
INSET-THE CORAL FAN-COLOUR GRAVURE
Saving Plant from the Enemy Rust By Louis Katin
Design and the Designer in Industry By Frank Pick
Research on Merits of Brass Type By C. C. Downie
Bringing Bond Street to the Million By Vincent Steer
Moulded Rubber Printing Plates – By Robert F. Salade
Notes on Hand Made Paper By James Guthrie
The Ebb and Flow
SUPPLEMENT-STUDENTS’ WORK, BRADFORD COLLEGE OF ARTS AND CRAFTS

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Linked Information

Printing Journal, No 22, Winter 1936-7
Printing Review, No 22, Winter 1936-7

 

Printing Journal, No 22, Winter 1936-7
Printing Review, No 22, Winter 1936-7

 

Printing Journal, No 22, Winter 1936-7
Printing Review, No 22, Winter 1936-7

 

Printing Journal, No 22, Winter 1936-7
Printing Review, No 22, Winter 1936-7
Printing Review was the Magazine of the British Printing Industry. The magazine published 79 issues between 1931 and 1959.
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The covers of the periodical ALMANAQUE, which was published in Lisbon, are perfect examples of this pleasure in the unusual and the force of with which all sorts of foreign influences are assimilated.

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