Schwarz und Weiss / Black and White, Poster Collection 8, 2003

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Author(s): Lars Müller
Edited by Museum für Gestaltung Zürich
With an essay by Essay von Lars Müller
Design: Integral Lars Müller
80 pages, 170 illustrations
paperback
2003, 978-3-03778-014-5, German/English

“While people tend to assume that the graphic design world will be brightly colored, this compilation of international posters dating from the last forty years is out to prove that there is an advantage to be hard in working without color. Morphological investigation of the Poster Collection’s stock has brought to light a surprising variety of approaches where the creative will to exploit the color of the paper and the black of the ink alone is the driving force behind the posters succinct statement. Typical examples come from designers like AG Fronzoni, Werner Jeker, James Victore or Büro Destruct. The work ranges from “coolness” to modernist ascetism, from the political manifesto to poetic abstraction.” Lars Müller Publishers

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Schwarz und Weiss / Black and White, Poster Collection 8, 2003
Schwarz und Weiss / Black and White, Poster Collection 8, 2003
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