Bundesministerium für Post und Telekommunikation, Poster, 1956 designed by Hans Schweiss. Scanned from Gebrauchsgraphik 06, 1956

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Posters from the 1956 Best German Posters Awards (Die besten Plakate des Jahres)

Gebrauchsgraphik 06, 1956 features a selection of the posters entered into the 1956 awards. It is unknown how many entries were submitted to the 1956 awards but a total of 21 posters were awarded.

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