Norman Granz presents Kid Ory, Programme, 1959. Designed by Hans Michel + Günther Kieser. Art Director Horst Lippmann

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A selection of graphic design articles based on the design artefacts in the archive. Articles discussing aspects of design such as logos, advertisements, posters and book covers. Explore historical context and its impact on the field of graphic design.
Norman Granz presents Kid Ory, Programme, 1959. Designed by Hans Michel + Günther Kieser. Art Director Horst Lippmann

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As part of their marketing strategy, Kast + Ehinger, commissioned a selection of German designers to produce advertisements aimed at the design industry. I have scanned in quite a lot of their advertising matter, all of which were back-page advertisements from three German design magazines. Der Druckspiegel, Gebrauchsgraphik and Graphik – Werbung + Formgebung.

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“Der Druckspiegel” typographic supplement May 5, 1967, was focused on a selection of the winning entries from Die besten Plakate des Jahres featuring over fifty winning entries.

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One of my standout collected pieces is Erberto Carboni’s Crociere 1937 “Italia” Brochure, created for the Societa di Navigazione’s 1937 cruise schedule.

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The 1960 awards presented 420 poster entries from Swiss designers. Notable winners included Robert Büchler's typographic poster for the Museum of Applied Arts Basel and J. Müller-Brockmann’s Der Film poster for the Museum of Applied Arts and Gerstner + Kutter's asymmetric typographic poster for National-Zeitung SA Basel.

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As part of an ongoing series showcasing Swiss poster designs from the 1950s and 1960s, this article features 1961 poster entries of Die besten Plakate des Jahres (The Best Posters of the Year) 1961. Originating in 1941, Die besten Plakate des Jahres initially served as a platform for the evaluation and showcase of Swiss posters.

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Forward and a selection of poster designs entered to the Die besten Plakate des Jahres 1963. Featuring the work of Hans Hartmann, Jörg Hamburger, Jost Hochuli, and Armin Hofmann.

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A selection of poster designs from Die besten Plakate des Jahres 1958 with a translated foreword by Maria Netter. Featuring the work of Müller-Brockmann, Celestino Piatti, Donald Brun and Armin Hofmann.

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The best poster designs from Die besten Plakate des Jahres 1957 with a translated foreword by Walter Kern. Featuring the work of J. Müller-Brockmann, Gottlieb Soland, Mary Vieira and Celestino Piatti.

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The best poster designs from Die besten Plakate des Jahres 1956 with a translated foreword by Jakob Rudolf Welti. Featuring the work of Herbert Leupin, Carl B. Graf, Carlo Vivarelli and Emil Ruder.

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A short essay and scanned advertising from Swiss Industrial Graphic Design. A rare book focused on effective industrial promotion authored by Hans Neuburg. The design of the book is credited to Hans Neuburg and Walter Bangerter.

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Perusing an issue of Der Druckspiegel from 1962, I found these fantastic examples of Swiss Design, produced for the University Ball at the University in St. Gallen, Switzerland, in 1961. The advertising matter included posters, newspaper advertisements, cinema slides, invitation cards and a booklet. 

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Gregory Vines' design and process behind the Typographische Monatsblätter 1978 covers. From the initial inspiration drawn from Bellinzona's gate to the process of film montage, resulting in six stunning cover masterpieces.

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Advertisements from post-World War II Britain for British Aluminium Company. Designs by Abram Games, Tom Eckersley, FHK Henrion, Pat Keely, and James Hart, who collectively crafted over 100 four-color and 300 black-and-white advertisements.

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Blase’s long-term clients were Staatstheater Kassel (Kassel State Theater) and Atlas Films. Karl Oskar Blase produced countless posters for these two organisations. It’s not surprising considering Blase designed posters for the Staatstheater for twelve years between 1966 and 1978. 

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Albrecht Ade's students produced some great typographic compositions and print work in his typography class, here's a selection of the work and information about Albrecht Ade.

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The advertising agency played a crucial role in shaping consumer culture by acting as a bridge between businesses and the media and was stated to have started in the mid-19th century.

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His distinctive style echoes the artistic expressions of fellow Italian designers Giovanni Pintori and Erberto Carboni. Tovaglia's mastery in taking concepts and translating them into visually compelling narratives is evident in this selection of advertisements I have scanned from Gebrauchsgraphik, 10, 1955.

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Nikon commissioned Yusaku Kamekura to design numerous posters, packaging designs and advertisements for Nikon. His used abstract forms, an impactful use of colours, along with his skilful reduction of messaging.

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KLM's brand evolution by Henrion Design Associates. Founded in 1919, KLM is the world's oldest operating airline. In 1961, Henrion Design Associates redesigned the iconic brand, overcoming challenges of standardisation and outdated aesthetics.

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Wolfgang Weingart's artistic design delved into the intricacies of Swiss typography, skillfully dissecting its elements while venturing into texture and type experimentation. His layered montages radiated dynamic kinetic energy, standing in stark contrast to the minimalist approach of his instructors, embracing a more maximalist aesthetic.

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Japan's first foreign film venue, Shochikuza Theatre (1923) is an icon of Modernism. Its Art Deco-influenced advertising, showcased in the 1925 Shochikuza News magazine, offers a glimpse into Japans influences from the West.

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After researching further into the work designed by their practice, I found ten programmes designed between 1958 and 1960. These programmes were designed for a variety of live jazz events in Germany and all followed the same format.

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In 1964, Sugiura was commissioned by the magazine Design to design each of their twelve monthly cover designs. Creating a series of systems which set the foundations for the design.

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Magalhães developed over 180 brands and in addition to developing visual identities, he also developed designs for Brazilian notes and coins.

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Before ascending to fame within the contemporary art scene, Warhol enjoyed a thriving career as a commercial artist. His illustration work was commissioned by various magazines, including The New Yorker, Vogue, and Harper's Bazaar.

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1930s periodical 'Monografieën over filmkunst' designed by dutch designer Piet Zwart remains a pinnacle of Dutch avant-garde design.

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In the late 1950s, Hans W. Brose agency, with designers Pierre Mendell, Michael Engelmann, and Klaus Oberer, crafted a compelling, colourless campaign for Bols.

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I have a real passion for collecting Cinderella stamps and other ephemera and love the artistic and historical value of these items. The scarcity of some Cinderella stamps, especially those associated with significant historical events or rare advertising campaigns, makes them highly sought after in the philatelic world.

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The designer is unstated on these postcards, which were designed during the mid to late 1970s, but these playful illustrations alongside what looks to be Frankfurter Bold definitely fit the criteria of friendliness and efficiency

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Advances in production and 1950s chewing gum marketing. From Wrigley's iconic "Spearman" ads to Hiroshi Ohchi's designs for Harris Chewing Gum.

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Working alongside André Gürtler and Bruno Pfäffli, Adrian Frutiger designed many logo designs. Here is a selection of the designs which were featured in Der Druckspiegel, December 1961. I have also translated and rewritten the descriptions to provide more depth.

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The typographic supplement from Der Druckspiegel, October, 1961 features typographic compositions designed by Herbert Bossin. Bossin has solely used the typeface Folio, to illustrate its flexibility and versatility alongside imagery provided by Lothar Blanvalet Verlag.

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When perusing vintage publications, I often stumble upon forgotten or undocumented gems. In this article, I compare two remarkable advertisements designed for Sprengel Ltd byHerbert Zumpe and Karl Otto Goetz

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Crouwel was the successor to Willem Sandberg who used an avant-garde approach in his work, utilising torn-paper montage, mixing of sans serif and old Egyptian typefaces and often off-center positioning. Crouwel steered away from this artistic approach and implemented a cohesive design system and a strong identity that emulated the corporate identity boom of the 1950s and 60s.

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These one-colour forms have a playful but structured aesthetic through their geometric forms, they remind me of the abstract line drawings of Picasso blended with Jan Tschichold and the New Typography.

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Volkswagen commissioned a fantastic range of graphic designers, including Wolf Zimmermann, Hans Looser and Michael Engelmann. The designers amplified the brand image of Volkswagen with strikingly modern designs.

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He designed stamps from around 1955 and in the book Karl Oskar Blase, Briefmarken-Design, Verlag für Philatelistische Literatur, 1981, he was described as one of the most influential stamp designers in Germany.

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Beyond being mere artefacts of design, these examples encapsulate the dynamic changes Japan was undergoing during this period. The design output of this era not only served commercial purposes but also became a powerful medium for expressing these societal shifts.

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Little is known about the talented designer Günther Glückert. Born during the 1930s, a period that proved less than conducive to nurturing youthful artistic endeavours, did not halt Glückert's path of becoming a talented designer.

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The 1960s was an era characterised by political, social, and cultural shifts. The counterculture movement emerged as a response to the perceived failures of the mainstream establishment, sparking a wave of activism and alternative ideologies. And with these an array of printed matter. Counterculture publications, often referred to as the "underground press," became powerful platforms for dissent, expression, and the exploration of new ideas.