Poster for Nikon 1954, designed by Yusaku Kamekura. Scanned from Creation No.21, Yusaku Kamekura Issue, 1998

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Yusaku Kamekura and his Design for Nikon

Nikon commissioned Yusaku Kamekura to design numerous posters, packaging designs and advertisements for Nikon. He used abstract forms, an impactful use of colours, along with his skilful reduction of messaging.

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