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Design from Post-War Britain: Advertising for The British Aluminium Company

Advertisements from post-World War II Britain for British Aluminium Company. Designs by Abram Games, Tom Eckersley, FHK Henrion, Pat Keely, and James Hart, who collectively crafted over 100 four-color and 300 black-and-white advertisements.

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Among the young graphic artists of Berlin, who set to work after the war, Hans Adolf Albitz and Ruth Albitz-Geiß can claim special attention. In a short time, at a period when economic conditions were pretty unfavourable, they worked themselves so to the fore that their names came to mean something in Berlin publicity, and in western Germany their posters are known and appreciated, too.

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A total of 24 posters were created for the campaign during 1964, using the arrow symbol as a key features, representing power, motion and speed. The handmade lithographs use up to 19 colours, which were individually printed at large scale. The posters also utilise the brand colours red and yellow from Shells corporate identity.

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The designer is unstated on these postcards, which were designed during the mid to late 1970s, but these playful illustrations alongside what looks to be Frankfurter Bold definitely fit the criteria of friendliness and efficiency

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Interiors was an American magazine published by Whitney Publications, New York and ran from 1940. Before being relaunched as Interiors, the magazine was originally called The Upholsterer which ran from 1888 until 1940.