Fred Troller Design on Volume

The first comprehensive survey of Fred Troller!

Unit Editions launches Fred Troller Design on Volume – the first comprehensive survey of the work of a pioneering designer who brought Swiss modernism to America in the 1960s, via influential projects for clients including IBM, American Airlines and Geigy.

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Unit Editions launches Fred Troller Design on Volume – the first comprehensive survey of the work of a pioneering designer who brought Swiss modernism to America in the 1960s, via influential projects for clients including IBM, American Airlines and Geigy.

Graphic designer Fred Troller forged a Swiss modernist path through corporate America in a career that spanned five decades and began in the early 1950s. Troller’s dynamic approach made use of bold colour, photographic imagery and minimalist sans-serif typography.

Fred Troller Design
Fred Troller Design

His striking, type-led graphics were applied to everything from packaging for the Geigy Chemical Corporation to posters for American Airlines and paperback book covers for Doubleday and Random House. Troller was preoccupied with eliminating visual chaos and able to communicate complex ideas with concise minimalism – ideas that contrasted to the prevailing trends in US visual culture in the 1960s.

‘His designs successfully combined Swiss rigorousness with American vitality.’
– Massimo Vignelli

In 1966 he founded Troller Associates, in response to the burgeoning demand for unified graphic identity systems, trademarks and annual reports and worked with clients such as IBM, Cross Siclare Papers, Faber Castell, Hoffmann LaRoche, Champion International, Memorial Sloan Kettering, New York Zoological Society and more.

Fred Troller Design features work for clients including Geigy, American Airlines, IBM, Cross Siclare Papers, Faber Castell, Champion International and the New York Zoological Society, alongside a section dedicated to Troller’s many book covers, various posters he designed for Alfred University and the AIGA, in addition to personal photographs and drawings. Volume is offering two reward packages, including a Special Edition that features a bespoke slipcase, foil-blocked in three colours and hinged with a magnet fastening. The slipcase design references Troller’s work on pill sample packaging for Geigy.

Fred Troller Design is available for a short period only on Volume.
https://vol.co/collections/fred-troller-design

 

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