Hermann Rastorfer, VW 1500 Advertisment. Early 1960s. Scanned from Gebrauchsgraphik, 07, 1962 Cropped

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A New Visual Aesthetic. Hermann Rastorfer and the advertising for Volkswagen

Rastorfer transformed the advertising of Volkswagen and his work contrasted with that of the previously commissioned designers. It reiterates the importance of finding a designer who can transform your vision and adverting and how the significance of consistent messaging across advertisements, contributes to the creation of a memorable campaign 

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