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Content includes:
Ausstellungen Wettbewerbe
H. H. Baumann, Rückblick auf Osaka
G. Müller-Krauspe, Hat die Schillersche Stiftung an Attraktivität verloren?
Gespräche, Interviews
Die Bundesbahn fährt ins Design
form sprach mit Bundesbahn-Design-
Direktor Emil Schuh
„DIM”. Creativ Shop für Design ?
5 Fragen an Edwin A. Schricker
Werbung Grafik-Design
B. Mussey, ,,The power of print”
P. v. Kornatzki, Eine Anzeige ist eine Anzeige, ist eine Anzeige
F. Seitz, Zum Berufsbild des Grafik-Designers
Design-Theorien – E. Geyer/B. Bürdek, Design- Management
form-Forum – Th. Hirzel, Verräter an der Sache?
Produkte – Die black box von Braun. Der Computer am Arm
Markt – Produkte, gesehen und notiert

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Form, Internationale Revue 51, 3, 1970. Designed by Karl Heinz Krug
Form, Internationale Revue 51, 3, 1970. Designed by Karl Heinz Krug
More graphic design artefacts
From the design archive:
From the design archive:
From the design archive:
From the design archive:
More graphic design history articles
Ken was born in 1929, in Southampton and grew up in a small market town in North Devon. He was a principled man, with strong values and views against the hyper-consumerism we live with today. Ken studied at the London Central School of Arts and Crafts in the 1950s and was taught by Herbert Spencer, Anthony Froshaug and Jesse Collins. Whilst at the School he studied alongside designers Ken Briggs, Alan Fletcher and Colin Forbes.

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As part of an ongoing series showcasing Swiss poster designs from the 1950s and 1960s, this article features 1961 poster entries of Die besten Plakate des Jahres (The Best Posters of the Year) 1961. Originating in 1941, Die besten Plakate des Jahres initially served as a platform for the evaluation and showcase of Swiss posters.

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Collected Japanese ephemera From the late 1920s to the mid-1930s, from Japan's transformative period, with its robust industrial force accompanied by an increase in consumer culture.

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A total of 24 posters were created for the campaign during 1964, using the arrow symbol as a key features, representing power, motion and speed. The handmade lithographs use up to 19 colours, which were individually printed at large scale. The posters also utilise the brand colours red and yellow from Shells corporate identity.