Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925

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Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925. Cover design by Ernst Aufseeser
Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925. Cover design by Ernst Aufseeser

 

Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925. Cover design by Ernst Aufseeser
Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925. Cover design by Ernst Aufseeser

 

Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925
Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925

 

Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925
Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925

 

Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925
Offset Buch und Werbekunst, Der Offset-Verlag G.M.B.H., Leipzig, 1925
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Before setting up Ken Garland & Associates in Camden, London, Ken was art editor of Design magazine in 1956. The magazine was published by the Council of Industrial Design, which was set up in 1944 with the prime focus of supporting Britains economic recovery.

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A short essay and scanned advertising from Swiss Industrial Graphic Design. A rare book focused on effective industrial promotion authored by Hans Neuburg. The design of the book is credited to Hans Neuburg and Walter Bangerter.

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Both the And So To Embroider & And So to Sew bulletins were published by the Needlework Development Scheme. Established in 1934 and operating until 1961, the scheme was a partnership between educational establishments (Scottish art schools, Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow) and industry.
“They’ll never stand for that” and “It’s too modern” are, as George Plante aptly puts it, the restraintive thoughts which beset a commercial artist who tries to let himself go.