Typography papers 2, Department of Typography & Graphic Communication, University of Reading, 1997

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Content includes:
James Mosley: French academicians and modern typography: designing new types in the 1690s
Richard Southall: A survey of type design techniques before 1978
Michael Twyman: Engelmann’s Landscape alphabet
Robin Kinross: Type as critique
Gerrit Noordzij: Reply to Robin Kinross
Ole Lund: Why serifs are (still) important
Christopher Burke: Willy Wiegand and the Bremer Presse
Richard Hollis: Review of Graphic design (Jobling & Crowley)
Hendrik D.L. Vervliet: Review of Counterpunch (Smeijers)

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Typography papers 2, Department of Typography & Graphic Communication, University of Reading, 1997
Typography papers 2, Department of Typography & Graphic Communication, University of Reading, 1997
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I have always loved the design work created for Olivetti. The colourful midcentury designs by Italian designer Giovanni Pintori, the minimal typographic poster by Swiss designer Walter Ballmer and my personal favourite the 1959 poster for Olivetti designed by Herbert Bayer. I recently found out Triest Verlag released a new book, Visual identity and branding at Olivetti which contains further work by Xanti Schawinsky, Renato Zveteremich, Ettore Sottsass, Hans von Klier, Egidio Bonfante and Walter Ballmer.

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