Members Content

Giovanni Pintori and his definitive visual language for Olivetti

Giovanni began his work with Olivetti in March 1938, and his work was showcased in various exhibitions and had a clear distinctive style that amplified the Olivetti brand image. His design defined the company’s visual image, and the iconic geometric designs are still as powerful and engaging today as they were in the 1950s.

Share:

Members Content

This is a members-only article, gain access and support the archive for £1.99 a month.
Memberships help grow the design collection and share research on the history of graphic design.

You can sign up here.

Already a member?

Sign in below

More graphic design history articles

Members Content

Stephan Kantscheff (Stephan Kanschev) was a Bulgarian artist born in Kaefer, Todental. His colourful palette and joyous, folk-esque illustrations won him many commissions and his work was celebrated for both its quality and social significance.

Members Content

Advances in production and 1950s chewing gum marketing. From Wrigley's iconic "Spearman" ads to Hiroshi Ohchi's designs for Harris Chewing Gum.

Members Content

As part of their marketing strategy, Kast + Ehinger, commissioned a selection of German designers to produce advertisements aimed at the design industry. I have scanned in quite a lot of their advertising matter, all of which were back-page advertisements from three German design magazines. Der Druckspiegel, Gebrauchsgraphik and Graphik – Werbung + Formgebung.

Members Content

Wolfgang Weingart's artistic design delved into the intricacies of Swiss typography, skillfully dissecting its elements while venturing into texture and type experimentation. His layered montages radiated dynamic kinetic energy, standing in stark contrast to the minimalist approach of his instructors, embracing a more maximalist aesthetic.